To my Strawberry Fields

look ma no hands

This is a poem about a field near the house where I grew up. My friends and I used to hang out there, and when I went back to Oklahoma, I found many of the trees bulldozed to make way for a walking trail in the area. This prompted some reminiscing.

Inspired by my trip to Oklahoma, and how the things we hold onto from childhood pass away.

To my Strawberry Fields

I alone return to your natural sanctuary,
Playing the fool on the hill.
20 years have come and gone,
Since we first stumbled on your beauty.
Your train whistles still comfort me,
In my dark insomniac nights.
Your railroad shack and rusty classic cars long gone.
Your 100 year old bridge marred by graffiti that glorifies the death that I feel.
My friends are long grown and busy raising their own kids and careers.
Blanton is but a dot on old maps with its origins lost to history.
The greenery, trees, and streams of my youth are long destroyed by tank shaped bulldozers, my worst childhood fears come true.
I long for days spent with my friends,
Pretending to be musicians with log drums and stick guitars,
Sharing first smokes, and living in fantasy lands where dreams came true.
Memories of magical dusty pillows,
Swinging on rafters, climbing trees,
Hiking along the tracks,
Root beers, and toy pistols.
I brought everyone here who meant something to me, 
from best friends to soulmates, immortalizing this place in album covers and music videos.
Just like then, escaping my troubles to the silence of the shooting stars,
Meditating on what could have been.
Just like then still misunderstood.
In the middle of the night,
Before the sun arises,
It almost seems like it was back then,
A magical place that unites us all.
But I’m the only one here.
One lone sentimental soul,
Reminiscing to a different soundtrack not in sync with this time,
But blending into the scenery.
It’s just me, God, and the roar of locomotives on their way out west.
And that’s where I am soon to return.

This poem was published as a part of Look Ma! No Hands! If you dig it, please support the author, and grab a copy!

D.L. Lang is the current Poet Laureate of Vallejo, California. She is the author of ten books, and one spoken word album. Her poems have been published in the Benicia Herald, Jewish Journal, Poets Are Heroes Magazine, the Benicia First Tuesday Poets anthology Light & Shadow, and in A Poet’s Siddur: Friday Evening Liturgy through the Eyes of Poets. Lang has been a featured act at several events including the Vallejo Man March, Unity Day, Solidarity with Charlottesville, and International Peace Day. She is also a regular at Poetry by the Bay and leads the Poetry in Notion poetry circle. She has won ribbons and rosettes at the Alameda, Marin, San Mateo, and Solano County Fairs. Her poems have been transformed into songs, liturgy, and used as a means to advocate for causes.
About D.L. Lang 58 Articles
D.L. Lang is the current Poet Laureate of Vallejo, California. She is the author of ten books, and one spoken word album. Her poems have been published in the Benicia Herald, Jewish Journal, Poets Are Heroes Magazine, the Benicia First Tuesday Poets anthology Light & Shadow, and in A Poet’s Siddur: Friday Evening Liturgy through the Eyes of Poets. Lang has been a featured act at several events including the Vallejo Man March, Unity Day, Solidarity with Charlottesville, and International Peace Day. She is also a regular at Poetry by the Bay and leads the Poetry in Notion poetry circle. She has won ribbons and rosettes at the Alameda, Marin, San Mateo, and Solano County Fairs. Her poems have been transformed into songs, liturgy, and used as a means to advocate for causes.